Kaiwarra

Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), Saturday 27 August 1910, page 4

Kangaroo Island Farms.

No. IX. KAIWARRA.

In company with Cr A. Stirling, of the Kingscote District Council, a representative of this paper was, during the week, afforded an opportunity of travelling as far as Mr A. E. Edwards' Karatta, which is situated a little over 50 miles from Kingscote. Cr. Stirling was indulging in a trip ' out back' and extended an invitation which was promptly availed of. Leaving Kingscote on Monday evening the first halt for the night was made at Cr Stirling's residence, which is situated some miles beyond Birchmore — away in the heart of the scrub. Cr. Stirling is well satisfied with his ' ironstone' land, and predicts that in a few years, when the scrub and roots have been cleaned out and the ground sweetened, good yields will result. He is not going in for the cultivation of large areas straight away, but he is making a complete task of the clearing as he goes, and will extend his area each year. He has, at the present time, under cultivation, a crop of wheat which looks very promising. He is looking forward to the time when he will have better roads to travel for, as the track is at present, between the "turn-off" to Birchmore and Cr. Stirling's property, it is certainly not of great assistance to new settlers. There are also, between Kingscote and the bridge over the Cygnet at Boettcher's, some very bad patches of road which require attention.

Between 8 and 9 o'clock the following morning "the route" was again taken and the powerful pair of horses made light of the track. K.I. is early in the field with its wattle blossom, and the pleasing fragrance borne on the breeze from the depths of the scrub reminded one of the fact. Reaching Little Timber Creek we overtook Mr H. Hemer with his team on the road towards scene of operations in the shape of a contract which, it is to be hoped, will be only one of many to be let at an early date, for Islanders want good roads as well as a railway, and the Government, having full coffers just now, should not feel any hesitation in expending £10,000 on roads and bridges. A few miles further on and Kaiwarra homestead was sighted in the distance, perched on a rise upon which there was number of large trees. Away to the left stretched Murray's Lagoon, a great sheet of water which it situated a few miles from Hawk's Nest. Beyond that towered gigantic ramparts in the shape of huge, curiously formed sand hills which hid the Southern Ocean from view. To the right again wave on wave of undulating country under scrub, most of which will, in a few years' time, feel the iron sweep of the plough. Tracts of cleared land in the distance, with here and there stretches of vivid green, showed that the energetic settlers had already started building homes in Scrub land. Hearing Kaiwarra (formerly known as Mount Pleasant and referred to by Mr Jackson M.P., in a letter to the Port Pirie Recorder, as Mount Unpleasant) a revelation was unfolded to the travellers in the shape of a large tract of cultivated country on the estate which, as it came into closer view, showed a splendid growth, From the opening of the gate on arrival to closure on departure one is impressed by the fact that the men who are developing Kaiwarra, are not only optimists who firmly believe in a great future for their district, but men of action and thorough in all their work. Everything is ' spick-and-span,' showing that there are no drones about the place.

At the time of arrival Mr C. Engelbrecht was busy in his workshop but promptly dropped his tools and gave the visitors the usual hearty welcome to be met with in the bush. As time was limited, a tour of inspection — somewhat brief — but sufficient to obtain a grasp of what had been effected — was made. The homestead itself is nicely situated on a small rise — which, in spite of Mr Jackson's assertion to the contrary, has a pleasant aspect, studded as it is with a clump of large trees, the shade of which must prove very acceptable in the summer months. The vegetable garden adjoining the homestead is flourishing and there is a splendid show of Swedish cabbages, turnips, lettuce, peas, early onions, and the ordinary variety of cabbage. The stables are high and dry on the slope of the hill. Eighteen horses feed at present in the stalls, the flooring of which consists of flags of stone from Lake Ada — the yard ad joining being also paved with stone. The chaff house has a fine hard floor, being the result of an experiment of Mr Engelbrecht's — 4 parts ironstone and one of lime. The chaff-cutter is driven by a Hornsby motor engine. The stack of hay adjoining was the remains of a stack of 120 tons taken from Messrs Sanders, Engelbrecht and Lloyd's first season's crop of 61 acres — sufficient to ' see them through' until next harvest. An excellent idea is an enclosure erected for the working bullocks, on the slope of the hill, in the shape of a high wall of broombush constructed in the form of an amphitheatre — the enclosure being about a chain in diameter and containing stalls for 14 animals— these being afforded ample protection from the cutting winds. Kaiwarra has a fine team of bullocks, some scaling up to 1400lbs. weight and none under 1000lbs. They were purchased at Blackrock. A novel but effective shed for the storing of vehicles and implements next came under observation. A cut ting was made in the side of the hill for the walls-— a few logs placed in position to save further excavation and a roof erected over the whole — giving a fine shed— 60ft by 25ft. An adjournment was next made to the "smithy" and the store-room, and an inspection of a neatly constructed fowlhouse showed to what use that useful shrub— the broom-bush can be put to. When Messrs Sanders and Engelbrecht first started at Kaiwarra, there were only a few fowls about the place, but they bred quickly, and now there are between 200 and 300. At present the agricultural question is receiving the greatest attention there being 850 acres under wheat, oats and barley, but there are about 300 sheep on the estate and, later on, considerable attention will be de voted to pigs. Kaiwarra consists of 4000 acres of freehold, 300 acres being ironstone, and the rest composed of rich river flats, chocolate, loam, black loamy and red soils. The greatest portion of cultivated land this year is on the flats and, in spite of the heavy rains, has a uniformly fine appearance.

Messrs Sanders, Engelbrecht and Lloyd are great believers in drainage. They have already completed one main drain two miles in length which runs from near the homestead to the Eleanor River (a distance of two miles) and other drains leading into it. Great results must follow such a system, and this has been proved. Mr Engelbrecht instanced this by pointing to a tract of country under crop where last summer he recollected going on a duck-shooting expedition up to his waist in water. Strolling down to the cultivation paddocks for a brief inspection we were met by Mr Sanders who, like Mr Engelbrecht, is a strong believer in a solid future for Kangaroo Island. Mr Sanders believes that every man whose property takes in river flats should go in for potato-growing but as one who came from a potato-growing district, viz,, Mount Gambier, he would advise all such to make sure they have the best seed, even if they have to pay something extra. Last year, some fine potatoes, principally of the Snowflake variety were grown on Kaiwarra. In November 12 acres of Gippsland Pinkeyes will be sown. Judging from the inspection made a goodly quantity of produce should be shipped away from the estate this year. The whole area under cultivation looks well. The wheat comprises King's Early and Federation, barley Prior and Spring oats Calcutta Cape and Algerian. Seventeen acres of rape have given splendid results on the estate. During the worst months of the year 150 sheep, and a number of cattle and horses thrived on it. Two cows, which were not giving more than a third of a pan of milk, were turned out in the rape paddock, and before they were on it a week they were giving a full pan of milk in the morning and three quarters in the evening. Mr Engelbrecht is at present trying an experiment with French kale. This is a splendid fodder. We were informed that, in one instance, from half an acre on the mainland a van load was taken off every day for four months, and eventually the stalk was chaffed up. A half acre plot of onions, comprising three varieties, is also being tried, viz., Brown Spanish, Keeping Spanish, and James' Keeping, We were shown a cleared paddock near the house which, a few months ago, was under a mass of stumps and trees, but the forest devil was set to work on it and effected a marvellous transformation. On two acres of cocksfoot, which still looks healthy, ten sheep have been thriving for three months, and they are still ' going strong.' At Kaiwarra cocksfoot and perennial rye are the most favored grasses. As for manures experiments are being tried with various kinds which comprise, amongst others, bonedust and super, potash and sulphate of ammonia. Near the homestead a well is being put down. This will be connected with a reservoir placed amongst the trees on the rise, and will furnish a good system of water distribution for the summer months. After lunch the visitors continued their journey to Karatta — there being another twenty miles to negotiate before that goal was reached— carrying with them the impression that there is a big future for Kaiwarra.

Kangaroo Island Farms. (1910, August 27). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191635095

1883-1886 Mount Pleasant Station owned by Mr. Price. The original station house was built in 1883 and by Dec 1886 House and property was inhabited - Geoffrey Chapman

[1886] Mount Pleasant was a fancy name given to a very pretty spot by Mrs. Price, the better-half of the former occupier of the house and garden which still exists, although in a somewhat dilapidated state. There is no mountain anywhere near, but there is a mound or slight rise, crowned with a few mallees ...

Trip Across Kangaroo Island (by a botanist)

[1909] ... Mount Pleasant—which is neither mountain nor pleasant— and after leaving the homestead about 100 yards, we found things decidedly unpleasant ...

K.I. Not a Paradise - Harry Jackson MP

1880-1886 Mount Pleasant Station owned by Mr. Price. The original 4 roomed station house was built in 1883 and by Dec 1886 the house and property were reported to inhabited. Reports in 1880 suggest the Price family “cultivates a considerable quantity of barley” had set up a “significant gardens and orchards” Little information available on what happened to Mr & Mrs Price or when they first took up the pastoral lease

1898 to 1901 Mount Pleasant lease held by Henry Hosken. The Hoskens upgraded the residence, added another room on the front verandah, added a back verandah and built a separate laundry and bathroom. A substantial stone underground rain tank was built. Reported to have an extensive garden and orchard of fruit trees. Selina Hosken’s diary refers to: a shed with blacksmith forge, horse stables, horse carts, drays & wagons, a shearing shed , a hay shed containing a chaff room and chaff cutter.

1901 – 1906 Mount Pleasant Station lease: owned Edward Burgess, 83 square miles, and 32 square miles at Mount Pleasant South.

1906-1910 Mt Pleasant Station In 1906 was renamed “Kaiwarra Station”) owned and worked by C Engelbrecht and Sanders [Sanders, Engelbrecht and Lloyd]. Newspaper articles Reported C Engelbrecht and Sanders to have a total of 4,000 acres in the lease, 60 acres for oat hay, 350 acres under cultivation of wheat, and barley. Reported to have a shed 60 x 25ft with stables for 18 draft horses and hacks, a chaff house and chaff cutter. Sanders had a significant area under cultivation for potatoes. The house vegetable gardens included: Swedish cabbages, turnips, lettuces, onions plus ordinary cabbages.

1912 Kaiwarra Station lease owned by Mr Charles Anderson [possibly from 1910]

1926 Kaiwarra Station lease owned by Charlie Griffiths & family

1930’s to late 1950’s Kaiwarra Station owned by Robert David Buck


- Geoffrey Chapman

Charles Graham BURGESS was born 30 Dec 1891 in Mount Pleasant Station, Kangaroo Island, SA and died 31 Jul 1950 in Adelaide, SA
Walter Henry HOSKEN was born 22 Sep 1896 in Mount Pleasant, Kangaroo Island, SA and died 02 Apr 1920
Frederick John HOSKEN was born 22 Nov 1898 in Mount Pleasant, Kangaroo Island, SA and died 04 Mar 1981 in Colorado, USA
Ida Valerie BURGESS was born 14 Jul 1903 in Mt Pleasant, Kangaroo Island, SA and died 27 Oct 2007 (aged 104) Kingscote, Kangaroo Island, SA

Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), Saturday 27 August 1910, page 4

Kangaroo Island Farms.

No. IX. KAIWARRA.

In company with Cr A. Stirling, of the Kingscote District Council, a representative of this paper was, during the week, afforded an opportunity of travelling as far as Mr A. E. Edwards' Karatta, which is situated a little over 50 miles from Kingscote. Cr. Stirling was indulging in a trip ' out back' and extended an invitation which was promptly availed of. Leaving Kingscote on Monday evening the first halt for the night was made at Cr Stirling's residence, which is situated some miles beyond Birchmore — away in the heart of the scrub. Cr. Stirling is well satisfied with his 'ironstone' land, and predicts that in a few years, when the scrub and roots have been cleaned out and the ground sweetened, good yields will result. He is not going in for the cultivation of large areas straight away, but he is making a complete task of the clearing as he goes, and will extend his area each year. He has, at the present time, under cultivation, a crop of wheat which looks very promising. He is looking forward to the time when he will have better roads to travel for, as the track is at present, between the "turn-off" to Birchmore and Cr. Stirling's property, it is certainly not of great assistance to new settlers. There are also, between Kingscote and the bridge over the Cygnet at Boettcher's, some very bad patches of road which require attention.

Between 8 and 9 o'clock the following morning "the route" was again taken and the powerful pair of horses made light of the track. K.I. is early in the field with its wattle blossom, and the pleasing fragrance borne on the breeze from the depths of the scrub reminded one of the fact. Reaching Little Timber Creek we overtook Mr H. Hemer with his team on the road towards scene of operations in the shape of a contract which, it is to be hoped, will be only one of many to be let at an early date, for Islanders want good roads as well as a railway, and the Government, having full coffers just now, should not feel any hesitation in expending £10,000 on roads and bridges. A few miles further on and Kaiwarra homestead was sighted in the distance, perched on a rise upon which there was number of large trees. Away to the left stretched Murray's Lagoon, a great sheet of water which it situated a few miles from Hawk's Nest. Beyond that towered gigantic ramparts in the shape of huge, curiously formed sand hills which hid the Southern Ocean from view. To the right again wave on wave of undulating country under scrub, most of which will, in a few years' time, feel the iron sweep of the plough. Tracts of cleared land in the distance, with here and there stretches of vivid green, showed that the energetic settlers had already started building homes in Scrub land. Hearing Kaiwarra (formerly known as Mount Pleasant and referred to by Mr Jackson M.P., in a letter to the Port Pirie Recorder, as Mount Unpleasant) a revelation was unfolded to the travellers in the shape of a large tract of cultivated country on the estate which, as it came into closer view, showed a splendid growth, From the opening of the gate on arrival to closure on departure one is impressed by the fact that the men who are developing Kaiwarra, are not only optimists who firmly believe in a great future for their district, but men of action and thorough in all their work. Everything is 'spick-and-span,' showing that there are no drones about the place. At the time of arrival Mr C. Engelbrecht was busy in his workshop but promptly dropped his tools and gave the visitors the usual hearty welcome to be met with in the bush. As time was limited, a tour of inspection — somewhat brief — but sufficient to obtain a grasp of what had been effected — was made.

The homestead itself is nicely situated on a small rise — which, in spite of Mr Jackson's assertion to the contrary, has a pleasant aspect, studded as it is with a clump of large trees, the shade of which must prove very acceptable in the summer months. The vegetable garden adjoining the homestead is flourishing and there is a splendid show of Swedish cabbages, turnips, lettuce, peas, early onions, and the ordinary variety of cabbage. The stables are high and dry on the slope of the hill. Eighteen horses feed at present in the stalls, the flooring of which consists of flags of stone from Lake Ada — the yard adjoining being also paved with stone. The chaff house has a fine hard floor, being the result of an experiment of Mr Engelbrecht's — 4 parts ironstone and one of lime. The chaff-cutter is driven by a Hornsby motor engine. The stack of hay adjoining was the remains of a stack of 120 tons taken from Messrs Sanders, Engelbrecht and Lloyd's first season's crop of 61 acres — sufficient to 'see them through' until next harvest. An excellent idea is an enclosure erected for the working bullocks, on the slope of the hill, in the shape of a high wall of broombush constructed in the form of an amphitheatre — the enclosure being about a chain in diameter and containing stalls for 14 animals— these being afforded ample protection from the cutting winds. Kaiwarra has a fine team of bullocks, some scaling up to 1400lbs. weight and none under 1000lbs. They were purchased at Blackrock.

A novel but effective shed for the storing of vehicles and implements next came under observation. A cutting was made in the side of the hill for the walls-— a few logs placed in position to save further excavation and a roof erected over the whole — giving a fine shed— 60ft by 25ft. An adjournment was next made to the "smithy" and the store-room, and an inspection of a neatly constructed fowl-house showed to what use that useful shrub— the broom-bush can be put to. When Messrs Sanders and Engelbrecht first started at Kaiwarra, there were only a few fowls about the place, but they bred quickly, and now there are between 200 and 300.

At present the agricultural question is receiving the greatest attention there being 850 acres under wheat, oats and barley, but there are about 300 sheep on the estate and, later on, considerable attention will be devoted to pigs. Kaiwarra consists of 4000 acres of freehold, 300 acres being ironstone, and the rest composed of rich river flats, chocolate, loam, black loamy and red soils. The greatest portion of cultivated land this year is on the flats and, in spite of the heavy rains, has a uniformly fine appearance. Messrs Sanders, Engelbrecht and Lloyd are great believers in drainage. They have already completed one main drain two miles in length which runs.from near the homestead to the Eleanor River (a distance of two miles) and other drains leading into it. Great results must follow such a system, and this has been proved. Mr Engelbrecht instanced this by pointing to a tract of country under crop where last summer he recollected going on a duck-shooting expedition up to his waist in water.

Strolling down to the cultivation paddocks for a brief inspection we were met by Mr Sanders who, like Mr Engelbrecht, is a strong believer in a solid future for Kangaroo Island. Mr Sanders believes that every man whose property takes in river flats should go in for potato-growing but as one who came from a potato-growing district, viz,, Mount Gambier, he would advise all such to make sure they have the best seed, even if they have to pay something extra. Last year, some fine potatoes, principally of the Snowflake variety were grown on Kaiwarra. In November 12 acres of Gippsland Pinkeyes will be sown. Judging from the inspection made a goodly quantity of produce should be shipped away from the estate this year. The whole area under cultivation looks well. The wheat comprises King's Early and Federation, barley Prior and Spring oats Calcutta Cape and Algerian. Seventeen acres of rape have given splendid results on the estate. During the worst months of the year 150 sheep, and a number of cattle and horses thrived on it. Two cows, which were not giving more than a third of a pan of milk, were turned out in the rape paddock, and before they were on it a week they were giving a full pan of milk in the morning and three quarters in the evening. Mr Engelbrecht is at present trying an experiment with French kale. This is a splendid fodder. We were informed that, in one instance, from half an acre on the mainland a van load was taken off every day for four months, and eventually the stalk was chaffed up. A half acre plot of onions, comprising three varieties, is also being tried, viz., Brown Spanish, Keeping Spanish, and James' Keeping, We were shown a cleared paddock near the house which, a few months ago, was under a mass of stumps and trees, but the forest devil was set to work on it and effected a marvellous transformation. On two acres of cocksfoot, which still looks healthy, ten sheep have been thriving for three months, and they are still 'going strong.' At Kaiwarra cocksfoot and perennial rye are the most favored grasses. As for manures experiments are being tried with various kinds which comprise, amongst others, bonedust and super, potash and sulphate of ammonia. Near the homestead a well is being put down. This will be connected with a reservoir placed amongst the trees on the rise, and will furnish a good system of water distribution for the summer months. After lunch the visitors continued their journey to Karatta — there being another twenty miles to negotiate before that goal was reached— carrying with them the impression that there is a big future for Kaiwarra.

Kangaroo Island Farms. (1910, August 27). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191635095

Rainfall at Kaiwarra. [1909]

The above Island property (held by Messrs Sanders and Engelbrecht) has been declared a Commonwealth meteorological station. For the month of September the rainfall registered at Kaiwarra was 1.96.

RAINFALL AT KAIWARRA. (1909, October 9). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191638901

KANGAROO ISLAND DEVELOPMENT. AN OPTIMISTIC SETTLER. "A GREAT POTATO COUNTRY.''

The reports which have come to hand recently concerning the progress of settlement on Kangaroo Island have generally been of a most favourable character, and indicate that the men who have taken up land intend to stay. Particularly in the newer districts innumerable difficulties have to be surmounted, but the indomitable pluck, perseverance, and energy of the pioneers, combined with fairly substantial capital, are telling their tale, and where only a year or two ago low wild scrub held sway, now appear large cleared spaces, and in many instances good yielding crops.

—Down South.—

Gratifying headway has been made in the Hundred of Seddon, and it is said that more virile and effective development is going on there than in any other part of the island. One of the most enterprising and optimistic of the new settlers in this neighbourhood is Mr. L. S. Sanders, who, in partnership with Mr. L. W. Engelbrech, secured last September the well-known Mount Pleasant property, which they have since renamed Kaiwarra. The homestead is situated about 10 miles from Vivonne Bay, and the land includes between 500 and 600 acres of admirable river flats. In a chat with a representative of The Register on Friday afternoon Mr. Sanders, who is a vigorous believer in the potentialities of the island, remarked:— "We entered into possession on September 1, and found that 120 acres had been put under crop, principally oats. This was cut recently, and gave the satisfactory return of about 1½ tons to the acre. As a result we will have sufficient hay to carry us well over the next season— a fact for which we are duly thankful—seeing that practically nobody out there has hay, and it costs between £6 and £7 a ton to get fodder on to the farm. To test the soil we planted a small plot of maize about the middle of October. and already it has attained a height of over 5 ft. There is plenty of natural grass on the farm, consequently we are able to carry a few hundred sheep. We are still pushing on with clearing operations, and next season hope to be in a position to crop several hundred acres."

—Potatoes and Onions.—

Prior to going to the island Mr. Sanders resided in the Mount Gambier district, where he took a deep interest in potatoes. It was only natural, therefore, that when he became established at Kaiwarra his thoughts should immediately turn to the possibility of successfully cultivating the tubers on a portion of the excellent soil available. Here is what he had to say on the subject: — "I feel sure that there is a big opening for potato growing on the island. The climate is apparently most suitable, and the soil about all that can be desired. We have put in seven or eight acres as an experiment, and I understand that this is the largest area that has been similarly sown by any individual producer on the island. Up to the present the plants have done splendidly, look extremely healthy, and give promise of a capital return. The only thing which has prevented us from trying onion growing on a big scale also is the diffculty of obtaining the necessary labour to do the weeding, &c There is not the slightest doubt that the country is eminently adapted to their production.''

—A Suggestion.—

Mr. Sanders mentioned that the settlers in Seddon and Newland are delighted with the prospect of, comparatively speaking, soon having a jetty at Vivonne Bay. The contractors, he says, have arranged to begin the construction work next week, and, he believes, have to finish it within 13 months. Mr. Sanders is a thorough enthusiast concerning the future of the southern portion of the island. What is needed, however, he contends, is a light line of railway— a 2-ft. gauge would serve all requirements for a considerable time— from Vivonne Bay into, perhaps, the western portion of Seddon. then practically due west through the Hundred of Newland and the proposed new hundreds to Rocky River. Such a line would prove a tremendous stimulus to the vigorous opening up of the country, and materially increase the value of the land from the point of view of the Government.

THE MAN ON THE LAND. (1910, January 22). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 11. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60159004

The Kaiwarra Estate [1909]

A quantity of iron and timber, a team of 10 bullocks and a new waggon (Spencer make) arrived by the Karatta on Saturday last for the Kaiwarra Estate (formerly known as Mt. Pleasant.)

THE KAIWARRA ESTATE. (1909, November 13). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191632525

[1910] In the Hundred of Seddon another post office—with a weekly mail—has been opened, and has been called Kaiwarra. Messrs. Sanders & Engelbrecht, who now own the estate bearing that name, are carving their way in the interior. Their hay crop yielded 1½ tons to the acre, and there is 100 tons of hay in the stack, which will be a good standby for opening up new country, where never more than 10 tons has been grown before. Some eight acres of potatoes are looking first class.

KANGAROO ISLAND. (1910, February 5). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 14. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60162045

Fatal Accident at the Harriet River.

A fatal accident occurred at the Harriet River on Tuesday last when the youngest son of Mr L. W. Engelbrecht, of Kaiwarra, was killed. We understand that Mr A. Lloyd left Kaiwarra with a load of oats, for Vivonne Bay, having two horses in the lead and one in the shafts of the heavy dray. The lad — Max Engelbrecht — was with him. When near the Harriet River bridge the horses took fright and bolted, and a wheel struck the end of the bridge throwing Mr Lloyd and the lad out of the dray. Mr Lloyd held fast to the reins, but deceased must have fallen directly in front of the wheel which passed right over him, death, apparently, having been instantaneous. M.C. McElroy, accompanied by Mr V. H. F. Cook J,P., journeyed out to Kaiwarra and, after holding an inquiry, deemed an inquest unnecessary, the coroner giving it as his verdict "That Max Engelbrecht was accidentally killed at Harriet River, no blame being attachable to anyone." The remains were interred in the Kingscote Cemetery on Wednesday, in the presence of a large gathering of friends, and many floral tributes were laid upon the grave. General sympathy is extended to the sorrowing parents in their sad bereavement.

Fatal Accident at the Harriet River. (1910, April 2). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191629227

[1910] Wanted— A Telephone.

The settlers of Seddon, K.I., have secured one convenience in the shape of a Post Office, which is located at Kaiwarra. The need of telephonic communication is, however, badly felt. The telephone could be linked on to Kaiwarra from the Cape Borda line— a distance of 8 miles only. The cost to the Government would be trifling in comparison with the great convenience this would be to the settlers in the new district.

WANTED—A TELEPHONE. (1910, August 27). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191635100

Island Grown Potatoes.

[1911] A correspondent who recently paid a visit to the Kaiwarra Estate, South Coast, brought to this office during the week a sample collection of potatoes of the Redskin variety, taken from one root. The vegetables form a splendid illustration of the capabilities of the Island soil for potato growing. Our correspondent, who believes that Kaiwarra Estate will, in the near future, be exporting large consignments of the tuber annually, states that the manner in which this particular variety was growing indicated an average of 34 to 35 tons per acre. He added that there is a tract of about 10 acres, all told, on the estate, under potatoes. The sample may be inspected at this office.

Island Grown Potatoes. (1911, February 4). The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951), p. 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article191638413